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Attitude of Gratitude

Develop an attitude of gratitude, and give thanks for everything that happens to you, knowing that every step forward is a step toward achieving something bigger and better than your current situation.

      -Brian Tracy

I probably should have read this quote this morning. My day would have been much less stressful. I have screened many resumes, interviewed several people, had them complete pre-employment testing; but I haven’t found the right people- yet.   Sooo, today was completely chaotic. EMGs and Botox injections all day, plus turning rooms over, drawing up  Botox, keeping up with everything clinical, writing notes, dictating EMG reports, and so on and so on and so on.  Still here in fact, but I needed a break.

So I figured now would be a good time to consider that for which I am grateful, so I can change my attitude, that has been admittedly foul all day.

I’m truly grateful for the presence and patience of my husband. An electrical engineer (with a master’s from Vandy’s Owen College of Management) who left his career as an engineer when I opened my second location and needed someone like him to help (but I couldn’t afford anyone with his resume and experience). With no background in healthcare, he jumped right in and assumed responsibility for more than I can itemize. And to top it off, he is not too proud to work the front desk when needed or clean the floors when needed. My family actually thanks him for putting up with me- literally right in my face- they thank him, lol!  He calms me down when I’m acting a plum fool in the nurses station during clinic when I get angry and frustrated.

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I am also still grateful for the clean slate I have been given.  It makes me crazy when things are chaotic, and I make it worse by yelling at the only person in the trenches with me in my Franklin office; but I know that this is a step forward in achieving something “bigger and better” than my current situation.

 

 

Mindfulness

“Mindfulness is simply being aware of what is happening right now without wishing it were different; enjoying the pleasant without holding on when it changes (which it will); being with the unpleasant without fearing it will always be this way (which it won’t).”

– James Baraz      

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I tried. I really really did. But kept getting distracted with work stuff, house stuff, etc.

I’ll do a better job tomorrow.

What am I grateful for today: my vision. It’s not perfect, I need reading glasses now (ugh), but I can see the beauty all around me.

Roughly 22.5 million adult Americans (or nearly 10% of all adult Americans)  either “have trouble” seeing, even when wearing glasses or contact lenses, or are blind.*

 

*2014 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)

 

 

Cervicogenic Headaches – The “Neck Headache”

Cervicogenic Headaches – The “Neck Headache”

A cervicogenic headache is a headache disorder that affects an estimated 2.2% of the population. What makes a cervicogenic headache different from other headaches is that it is not truly a headache; it is actually a type of referred pain. Referred pain is when the body perceives pain in a location different from where the actual pain is. For example, sometimes when you hit your “funny bone” you may feel a pain in your shoulder. In this case, the headache pain is being referred from bones or soft tissues in the neck. The upper cervical spinal cord has many bundles of nerves that transfer sensation between the neck and the head, which allows for the referral of pain.

How Cervicogenic Headaches Are Diagnosed

Diagnosing a cervicogenic headache can be a difficult process. Though diagnostic criteria are established, often times the presenting patient’s symptoms are hard to tell apart from those of a migraine, tension headache, or other headache disorder. The approach to diagnosing a cervicogenic headache (and also treating it) is multi-disciplined. The diagnostic factors are:

  • Usually, cervicogenic headaches are unilateral, meaning they start on one side at the back of the head, migrate towards the front, and sometimes cause arm pain.
  • Misalignment, muscle spasms, or other cervical dysfunction during a manual exam.
  • Headaches that occur when pressing on a trigger point in the neck or head.
  • Sustained neck positions which aggravate the pain.
  • X-rays and other imaging returns with normal results.
  • Occasionally nausea and/or dizziness.

Some types of cervicogenic headaches cause bilateral pain, and the headache starts out as neck pain or the neck pain exists along with the headache. In this form, the pain is exacerbated by certain movements of the neck. This form of headache is more common in occupations like hair-dressing, truck driving, or carpentry.

Who Gets Cervicogenic Headaches?

Roughly 47% of the world’s population suffers from headaches, and it is estimated that 15-20% of those are cervicogenic. Some research suggests that adults with neck pain are more susceptible to cervicogenic headaches. It has also been noted that four times as many females as males get cervicogenic headaches. During an examination, a doctor will consider any history of trauma, as well as the age of the patient. Usually, younger patients (ages 10-13) have dysfunction in the lower cervical spine, whereas older patients tend to have dysfunction in the upper cervical spine.

How Are Cervicogenic Headaches Treated?

Like diagnosis, treatment should be multi-disciplined. Usually, it is a combination of posture adjustment, massage, physiotherapy, acupuncture, steroid injections, hydrotherapy, and medication. Most patients (70%) are pain-free within a month.

 

To learn more or to seek treatment, contact KCA Neurology in Franklin and Clarksville, TN at 615.550.1800.